Liste chronologique de spectacles en français à la cour de Russie (1762-1796)

LISTE CHRONOLOGIQUE DES SPECTACLES JOUÉS EN FRANÇAIS EN RUSSIE (1762-1796).

Advertisements

Debt: 5000 Years and Counting. An unusual conference

Debt: 5000 Years and Counting

Call for papers will explain what is unusual about the conference: https://www.birmingham.ac.uk/schools/historycultures/research/events/2018/debt-500.aspx

I just wanted to publish the programme that is not available elsewhere.

8–9 June 2018

Schedule

Friday 8 June

12:30-13:15 Lunch + Registration

13:15-14:45 Conversation 1 (Jonathan Neale & Benedetta Rossi)

14:45-15:15 Coffee/Tea

15:15-16:45 Session 1 (groups 1-2-3-4-5)

17:00-18:30 David Graeber, ‘Debt, Service and the Origins of Capitalism’

19:30 Conference dinner at Khayyam’s Restaurant (135 Tenant Street, Birmingham)

 

Saturday 9 June

9:30-11:00 Conversation 2 (Arietta Papaconstantinou & Katrien De Graef)

11:00-11:30 Coffee/Tea

11:30-13:00 Session 2 (groups A-B-C-D)

13:00-13:45 Lunch

13:45-15:15 Session 3 (groups 1-2-3-4-5)

15:15-15:45 Coffee/Tea

15:45-17:30 Conversation 3/Concluding plenary discussion (Kate Belgrave & Fanny Malinen)

 

 

List of papers organised by groups

‘Random’ Groups

Group 1 (Arietta Papaconstantinou)

Richard Bell, ‘Imprisonment for debt and carceral hegemony in early modern England’

Alexei Evstratov, ‘Debtor in Fabula: Literary and Economic Relations in Eighteenth-Century Europe’

Ben Pugh, ‘Debt and the theology of redemption’

Jovia Salifu, ‘Baseline communism among market women in the Assante town of Offinso, Ghana’

Marini Thorne, ‘Debt and duality; the negotiation of citizen and sovereign in contemporary Britain’

Jules Gleeson, ‘Byzantine historiography, Byzantine household – what’s missing from Debt: the First 5,000 Years?’

 

Group 2 (Lucie Ryzova)

Yasemin Akçagüner, ‘Feigned friendships in the frontier: fourteenth-century Ottoman-Byzantine debt relations’

Lorenzo Bondioli, ‘Debt, credit, and the state: a view from the Islamic Middle Ages’

Katrien De Graef, ‘Sisyphus in Mesopotamia: Debts and Their Cancellation in Old Babylonian Economy’

Robin Latimer, ‘Debt in the 21st century’

Fanny Malinen, ‘Citizen debt audits: hacking the power of finance’

Jerome Roos, ‘The longue durée of sovereign debt’

Jonathan Warner, ‘Debt and the theology of redemption’

 

Group 3 (Simon Yarrow)

Maria Aleksandrova, ‘Absolutist monarchs playing market games. A case study from mid-sixteenth century England’

Martina McAuley, ‘The morality of debt in the neoliberal era’

Kate Padgett Walsh, ‘Moral confusion and the ethics of debt’

Alan Shipman, ‘A tale of trapped equity. Revisiting the prequel to the debt crisis’

Ulara Tamura, ‘Trading days. An examination of labor exchange in Turkish carpet weaving villages’

Nathan Tankus, ‘Gods, kinship, and the state: the case for political neochartalism’

 

Group 4 (Tom Cutterham)

Philippa Byrne, ‘Where debt has no dominion: owing, medieval temporality and the liberating possibilities of the apocalypse’

Michael Hamilton, ‘Post-metal: how money/debt virtually eludes the conversation’

Pelin Kılınçarslan, ‘How do women experience debt and indebtedness? A comparative analysis of Greece and Turkey’

Thanasis Nasiaras, ‘Greek state in debt crisis: a “serial” debtor in historical perspective’

Alexandra Vukovich, ‘Debt and Morality in Early Rus: The Perils of Promises’

Jamara Wakefield, ‘Uncomfortable truths: debt, black bodies and the colonial university’

 

Group 5 (Benedetta Rossi)

Tim Christiaens, ‘Is Debt always a Biopolitical Instrument?’

Niamh Hopkins, ‘An exploration of debt in Aristotle’s theory of justice’

Joost Possemiers, ‘Late medieval and early modern theologians and jurists on debt and sin: the example of Conrad Summenhart (c. 1458-1502)’

Anna Boeles Rowland, ‘Gender, material culture, and social debt in later medieval London’

Andris Šuvajevs, ‘The silent totalitarianism: neo-colonial politics of debt in East Europe’

Sandy Xu, ‘Embodied Debt, Reproductive Labour and Disability in Maoist China’

 

‘Themed’ Groups

Group A (Benedetta Rossi)

Tim Christiaens, ‘Is Debt always a Biopolitical Instrument?’

Pelin Kılınçarslan, ‘How do women experience debt and indebtedness? A comparative analysis of Greece and Turkey’

Jovia Salifu, ‘Baseline communism among market women in the Assante town of Offinso, Ghana’

Ulara Tamura, ‘Trading days. An examination of labor exchange in Turkish carpet weaving villages’

Marini Thorne, ‘Debt and duality; the negotiation of citizen and sovereign in contemporary Britain’

Sandy Xu, ‘Embodied Debt, Reproductive Labour and Disability in Maoist China’

 

Group B (Tom Cutterham)

Robin Latimer, ‘Debt in the 21st century’

Fanny Malinen, ‘Citizen debt audits: hacking the power of finance’

Martina McAuley, ‘The morality of debt in the neoliberal era’

Kate Padgett Walsh, ‘Moral confusion and the ethics of debt’

Alan Shipman, ‘A tale of trapped equity. Revisiting the prequel to the debt crisis’

Andris Šuvajevs, ‘The silent totalitarianism: neo-colonial politics of debt in East Europe’

Nathan Tankus, ‘Gods, kinship, and the state: the case for political neochartalism’

Michael Hamilton, ‘Post-metal: how money/debt virtually eludes the conversation’

Jamara Wakefield, ‘Uncomfortable truths: debt, black bodies and the colonial university’

 

Group C (Arietta Papaconstantinou)

Jules Gleeson, ‘Byzantine historiography, Byzantine household – what’s missing from Debt: the First 5,000 Years?’

Ben Pugh, ‘Debt and the theology of redemption’

Lorenzo Bondioli, ‘Debt, credit, and the state: a view from the Islamic Middle Ages’

Katrien De Graef, ‘Sisyphus in Mesopotamia: Debts and Their Cancellation in Old Babylonian Economy’

Jonathan Warner, ‘Debt and the theology of redemption’

Philippa Byrne, ‘Where debt has no dominion: owing, medieval temporality and the liberating possibilities of the apocalypse’

Alexandra Vukovich, ‘Debt and Morality in Early Rus: The Perils of Promises’

Niamh Hopkins, ‘An exploration of debt in Aristotle’s theory of justice’

 

Group D (Simon Yarrow)

Yasemin Akçagüner, ‘Feigned friendships in the frontier: fourteenth-century Ottoman-Byzantine debt relations’

Maria Aleksandrova, ‘Absolutist monarchs playing market games. A case study from mid-sixteenth century England’

Richard Bell, ‘Imprisonment for debt and carceral hegemony in early modern England’

Alexei Evstratov, ‘Debtor in Fabula: Literary and Economic Relations in Eighteenth-Century Europe’

Jerome Roos, ‘The longue durée of sovereign debt’

Thanasis Nasiaras, ‘Greek state in debt crisis: a “serial” debtor in historical perspective’

Joost Possemiers, ‘Late medieval and early modern theologians and jurists on debt and sin: the example of Conrad Summenhart (c. 1458-1502)’

Anna Boeles Rowland, ‘Gender, material culture, and social debt in later medieval London’

NLP and the French Revolution

Did anybody manage to read the study? Its presentation is just perfect in its own way.

“By analyzing word patterns from the French Revolution Digital Archive to determine how novel they were and whether they persisted or disappeared, the researchers provided evidence for the argument that debates in the assembly produced the revolution’s ideals and principles.

By analyzing word patterns from the French Revolution Digital Archive to determine how novel they were and whether they persisted or disappeared, the researchers provided evidence for the argument that debates in the assembly produced the revolution’s ideals and principles”.

Base de données sur les débats liés aux arts du dessin entre 1789 et 1792

Art et Démocratie. Les débats liés aux arts du dessin entre 1789 et 1792

Base de données constituée par Desmond-Bryan Kraege, Matthieu Lett et Sibylle Menal sous la direction de Christian Michel

“Nous avons réuni sur ce site l’ensemble des textes venus à notre connaissance qui interrogent ce que doit être le statut des arts dans un pays où il a été proclamé que le « principe de toute souveraineté réside essentiellement dans la Nation. » (Déclaration des droits de l’homme, article II). Sur cette base, toutes les institutions monarchiques, sur lesquelles reposait le système des arts sous l’Ancien Régime, doivent être repensées et réformées. Ce sont pendant ces années qu’apparaissent des questions qui sont toujours d’actualité : la définition de l’artiste par rapport au praticien ou à l’artisan, la nécessité ou non d’un enseignement artistique, la forme que celui-ci doit prendre, la façon dont doivent être passées les commandes publiques, le droit des artistes sur la diffusion de reproductions de leurs œuvres, doivent désormais être fondés sur la raison et être compatible avec la liberté et l’égalité des droits”.

 

Workshop ‘Event – Dispositif – Agency in the Arts and Literature (1750-1980).’ Programme

Poster Dispositif WorkshopWorkshop at Dahlem Humanities Center (Freie Universität Berlin) // 11 January 2018

Programme

9.30-11.00

Discussant: Gigi Adair (Potsdam)

Alexei Evstratov (Berlin): Event – Dispositif – Agency. Theories and Histories

Marianne Brooker (London): ‘This strange and mixed assemblage’: ‘Co-perusual’ in Sir John Soane’s House and Museum

11.30-13.00

Discussant: Gesa Frömming (Berlin)

Stacie Allan (Oxford): Emotional Connections, Philosophical Reflections, and Reciprocal Reading Practices: The Example of Claire de Duras’s Édouard (1825)

Kirill Ospovat (Berlin): Proletarian Reading: Literature and the Lower Classes in Dostoevsky’s Poor Folk

 

14.30-16.00

Discussant: Mischa Gabowitsch (Potsdam)

Ilya Venyavkin (Moscow): Stalin, Kirov, and Invisible Death: Audience of Terror in Soviet Culture of the 1930s

Natalia Prikhodko (Paris): Performativity, Perception, and Subjectivity in the Artistic Practices of Moscow Conceptualism in the 1970s

16.30-18.00

Discussant: Fabian Goppelsröder (Berlin)

Alo Paistik (Paris): Ways of reconstructing the sites of experience of early cinema

Esteban Buch (Paris): For a micro-history of the listening experience

Venue:

“Rostlaube” – Room L 116

Habelschwerdter Allee 45

14195 Berlin-Dahlem

3 October 1789: loans with interest & the clergy in the Assembly

Versailles…

La séance est ouverte ce matin par une discussion sur le prêt à intérêt. On sait que les prêtres regardaient ci-devant comme usuraire l’intérêt de l’argent placé à terme fixe. C’était un abus manifeste de leurs propres principes théologiques, des raisonnements et des citations dont ils les appuient. Le jour de la lumière est venu en partie ; peut-être l’esprit public n’a-t-il pas fait encore assez de progrès pour que nous disions : l’usure ne consiste pas dans l’excès d’un taux quelconque, elle consiste dans les circonstances où se trouvent réciproquement le prêteur et l’emprunteur. (…)

Il est évident que le prêt à intérêt est une des opérations les plus nécessaires à la prospérité de l’agriculture, du commerce et des arts, et l’on a extrêmement bien fait de l’autoriser. (…)

Il est, au reste, fort remarquable que plusieurs curés ont parlé en faveur du prêt à intérêt, et que l’archevêque d’Aix, l’évêque de Chartres et d’autres prélats ont appuyé leur opinion ; il y a eu, à ce sujet, une grande unanimité dans le clergé. L’évêque d’Oléron est le seul qui, après la prononciation du décret, a dit que sa conscience, non seulement lui défendait d’y adhérer, mais encore lui commandait de s’y opposer de tout son pouvoir. (…)

Journal d’Adrien Duquesnoy, député du Tiers état de Bar-le-Duc, sur l’Assemblée constituante : 3 mai 1789-3 avril 1790, t. 1 (Paris, 1894), p. 390-392.

2 October 1792: portraits of Marat, Robespierre, Danton, and Collot d’Herbois

Tu m’as demandé, papa, mon sentiment sur chacun des députés de Paris ; je satisfais à ton voeu.

Un de ceux dont la nomination atteste surtout la lâcheté et l’étrange turpitude des électeurs, un de ceux que l’opinion publique réprouve avec le plus de force, est, comme tu ne l’ignores pas, le forcené Marat. Quels que soient cependant les projets désastreux de cet homme sanguinaire, je crois qu’il y a encore plus de folie dans sa tête que de perversité dans son coeur. (…)

Après le nom de Marat l’opinion publique place, à regret sans doute, celui de Robespierre. Voilà quelle est la juste récompense des excès où l’ont entraîné son amour-propre et son opiniâtreté dans des opinions erronées. Voilà quel est le triste résultat des louanges sans nombre que nous lui avons prodiguées ; c’est nous mêmes qui gâtons les hommes publics.

Des vices domestiques, une conduite privée peu estimable, des dettes nombreuses, voilà ce qu’on reproche à Danton ; mais, en revanche, on admire en lui l’homme d’État, de grandes vertus politiques, une âme intrépide et forte, une éloquence irrésistible, une vaste perspicacité de vues; heureux si avec ces grands avantages, il ne se livrait trop souvent à des passions haineuses et jalouses ! (…)

Collot d’Herbois ne manque ni de talent ni d’énergie. A la vérité, cette énergie dégénère quelquefois en exaltation. C’est un de ces hommes faits pour un moment de crise et de Révolution, un déclamateur adroit, quoique plein de chaleur et de véhémence ; je doute de ses talents en fait de législation, mais non en fait d’insurrection. (…)

Edmond Géraud to his father, in Gaston Maugras, Journal d’un étudiant (Edmond Géraud) pendant la Révolution, 1789-1793, 3ème éd. (Paris, 1890), p. 559-560.

1 October 1789: a member of the Assembly is home sick

Versailles…

Je ne te dirai qu’un mot, ma bonne amie, uniquement pour te tranquilliser. Je me porte très bien. Tes lettres font mon plus grand plaisir. J’attends avec avec impatience les jours de courrier ; tout ce qui m’intéresse est à cent lieues de moi. J’entre dans tes raisons, ma bonne amie, je sens l’ennui que te cause le voyage, l’embarras de ma fille ; ainsi réflexion faite, ne viens point. Je passerai le mois d’octobre, et si nous demeurons l’hiver dans ce vilain pays, je te le manderai. Alors nous prendrons d’autres arrangements. (…)

Marquis de Ferrières to his wife, in Marquis de Ferrières, Correspondance inédite 1789, 1790, 1791, publiée et annotée par Henri Carré (Paris: Librairie Armand Colin, 1932), p. 168.

30 September 1789: ‘un plat Personage’

Wednesday… (…) …go to Club. Attend to some Discussion of public Affairs which takes Place and then go to sup with my Friend [Mme de Flahaut – AE]. She has been triste all Day, fears Consequences, &c, &c, as Mons[ieu]r is gone to Madrid. Peu à peu nous nous rassurons. At Supper she receives a Note from L’E[vêque] d’A[utun]. We are to dine with her on Sunday. Madame de Stahl tells him that her father wishes much to see him placed. Stay till Midnight. I am rather un plat Personage for such a Tête à Tête, having had a severe Diarrhea for twenty-four Hours. This has been a fine Day.

A diary of the French revolution, by Gouverneur Morris, 1752-1816. Ed. by Beatrix Cary Davenport. Vol. 1 (Boston, 1939), p. 237.

29 September 1792: Paris is dull

…samedi…

(…) Tout est ici fort tranquille, mais je désire que mes affaires se terminent bientôt. Je dîne tous les jours chez le restaurateur sans être restauré ; je me couche au lieu de souper ; et comme je ne m’occupe ici que d’une seule affaire, je trouve les soirées fort ennuyeuses. Paris a l’air d’une petite ville de province : quelques fiacres, quelques patrouilles, pas une figure de connaissance. (…)

Les mauvais patriotes répandent ici que les Prussiens sont à Ay et à Reims, pour arriver à Paris sous quinze jours, comme s’ils étoient assez imbéciles pour venir provoquer 700.000  hommes libres qui sauroient les pulvériser en 24 heures, ainsi que tous leurs rois et leurs généraux. On travaille ici aux fossés et au camp sans relâche. (…)

De M. de Kolly à Mme Renaud, sa cousine, à Boulogne-sur-mer, in Pierre de Vaissière, ed. Lettres d’« aristocrates ». La Révolution racontée par des correspondances privées. 1789-1794 (Paris, 1907), p. 565.